Archives

Spring 2017

Topics in Ancient History - Religions in the Roman Empire
CLA 327 / HIS 327 / HLS 327 / REL 307

The course addresses a pivotal period of cultural and religious change in Mediterranean history and takes the form of an interdisciplinary journey among several religious communities living in the Roman Empire from the time of Augustus to the rise of Christianity. We will make use of the artistic, archeological and documentary record to learn about pagan sanctuaries, ancient synagogues and the earliest house churches used by Christians; and we will read ancient texts in order to understand the lives of the most influential historical players in the religious field, including the prophet Mani, Emperor Constantine and Julian 'the Apostate'.
Alberto Rigolio

Problems in Ancient History - Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Numismatics
CLA 548 / HLS 548 / PAW 548 / ART 532

A seminar covering the basic methodology of numismatics, including die, hoard and archaeological analysis as well as a survey of pre-modern coinages. The Western coinage tradition is covered, from its origins in the Greco-Persian world through classical and Hellenistic Greek coinage, Roman imperial and provincial issues, Parthian and Sasanian issues, the coinage of Byzantium, the Islamic world, and medieval and renaissance Europe. Students research and report on problems involving coinages related to their own areas of specialization. Open to undergraduates by permission of the instructor.
Alan M. Stahl

Methods in Byzantine Literature and Philology
CLA 598 / MED 598 / HLS 598

This course emphasizes proficiency in post-Classical and Medieval Greek language through close readings and translations of literature. In addition to surveying the principal genres of literature and the questions surrounding them, it also introduces Ph.D. students to the instrumenta studiorum of Late Antique and Byzantine philology, such as palaeography, codicology, text editing, databases and bibliography.
Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis

Mediterranean Contingencies: Byzantium and Its Medieval Others
COM 429 / HLS 429 / MED 429

Well before other medieval societies (both Christian and Muslim), Byzantium was flourishing in the 4th century. Greek-speaking (though bilingual with Latin until the 6th century), this self-proclaimed, New Rome, faced unprecedented challenges. It grew into an immense empire, an empire, paradoxically, whose cultural influence spread over the centuries in inverse proportion to its political strength. Topics we will consider include: definitions of empire, definitions of Byzantium over its 1,100-year evolution, issues of ethnicity and race and the inextricable relationship of historiography and fiction.
Marina S. Brownlee

The World of Late Antiquity
HIS 210 / HLS 210 / CLA 202

This course will focus on the history of the later Roman Empire, a period which historians often refer to as "Late Antiquity." We will begin our class in pagan Rome at the start of the third century and end it in Baghdad in the ninth century: in between these two points, the Mediterranean world experienced a series of cultural and political revolutions whose reverberations can still be felt today. We will witness civil wars, barbarian invasions, the triumph of Christianity over paganism, the fall of the Western Empire, the rise of Islam, the Greco-Arabic translation movement and much more.
Jack B. Tannous

Introduction to Medieval Latin
LAT 232

Selections from Medieval Latin prose and poetry, with emphasis on Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. Attention to developments in Latin in the period, as well as to textual transmission and the reception of the Classics.
Daniela E. Mairhofer

Plato's Legacy in the Middle Ages
MED 336 / CLA 337

A survey of the most important Neoplatonic philosophers and Christian writers of Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages influenced by Neoplatonism, up to the late 13th century; the emphasis is very much on the reception of Plato's dialogue Timaeus, more specifically on the creation of the world.
Daniela E. Mairhofer

In the Shadow of Swords: War, Martyrdom and the Afterlife in Islam
REL 235 / NES 235

How were just war, holy war, and martyrdom imagined and enacted over the centuries in Islamic societies? How do concepts of the afterlife inform attitudes towards war and martyrdom? We begin in the Late Antique world with a survey of noble death, martyrdom, holy war, and just war, in the Roman, Jewish and Christian traditions. We explore these topics in the Islamic tradition through case studies: the Arab conquests, the Crusades, Spain and the Reconquista, the Iran-Iraq war and contemporary jihadist movements. We use primary sources in translation (including fiction and poetry) and, for modern period, films and internet.
Shaun E. Marmon

The New Testament and Christian Origins
REL 251

To trace the origins of Christianity from its beginnings as a movement within ancient Judaism to its gradual transformation and emergence as an independent religious movement in the Roman Empire and beyond. To read the New Testament with a critical eye, i.e., as a collection of documents illustrating differing emphases and stages in the growth of early Christianity.
John G. Gager

Studies in Greco-Roman Religions - Late Antique Jewish Texts and Material Culture in Christian Context
REL 504

The fifth through eighth centuries saw the emergence of a variety of forms of literature outside the rabbinic corpus among Jews in Palestine & Babylonia. At the same time, Jewish communities in Palestine & elsewhere commissioned a significant body of mosaics & other ritual & decorative objects for their synagogues. We consider both texts & material evidence to develop a more variegated picture of Jews & Judaism in late antiquity, with units on the liturgical poetry (piyyut) & mosaic art of the synagogue, apocalyptic literature & hekhalot texts, & the narrative midrash Pirqei Rabbi Eliezer, in their larger, primarily Christian, context.
Ra'anan S. Boustan, Martha Himmelfarb

Religions of Late Antiquity Workshop
REL 526

A weekly, year-long workshop providing students in the Religions of Late Antiquity with the opportunity to present their current research for discussion. Note: REL 525 (fall) and REL 526 (spring) constitute this year-long workshop. In order to receive credit and/or a grade, students must take the course both semesters.
AnneMarie Luijendijk


Fall 2016

Art and Power in the Middle Ages
ART 228 / HLS 228 / MED 228 / HUM 228

In twelve weeks this course will examine major art works from the twelve centuries (300-1500 CE) that encompass the European Middle Ages. Presenting works from Europe and the Middle East, the course will introduce students to the art of Catholicism and Orthodoxy, Judaism and Islam; the great courts of the Eastern- and Holy Roman Empires, and the roving Vikings, Celts and Visigoths. Students will not only be invited to consider how art can represent and shape notions of sacred and secular power, but will also come to understand how the work of 'art' in this period is itself powerful and, sometimes, dangerous.
Charlie Barber, Beatrice E. Kitzinger

Antioch through the Ages - Archaeology and History
ART 418 /HLS 418 /CLA 418 /PAW 418

Antioch was unique among the great cities of the classical world for its position at the crossroads between the Mediterranean Sea and the Asian continent and for being a new foundation of the Hellenistic age that shrunk almost to insignificance in the modern era. Students in this course will get exclusive access to the archives and artifacts of the Princeton Antioch excavations of the 1930s. In the 2016 course, the focus will be on the theatre excavated in the Daphne region overlooking the city of Antioch, site of pagan performances well into the Christian era; students will study and report on its architecture, decor and use.
Alan M. Stahl

Medieval Art - The Icon
ART 430 / HLS 430 / MED 430

The topic for this seminar will be the icon, a medium that developed in Late Antiquity and that continues to be a major and influential form of painting. We will examine the history, function, theory and meaning of the icon, and will also examine the icon's influence upon the discourses of Modernism. A more practical aspect of this seminar is that participants will work with the Princeton University Art Museum's newly acquired collection of icon painter's preparatory drawings, preparing catalogue entries for a virtual exhibition of this material.
Charlie Barber

Constantinople: A Literary Journey to the Capital of Byzantium
CLA 230 / HLS 230 / MED 231

Our focus is the city of Constantinople. Designated 'New Rome' to rule the Christian East at the crossroads of Europe and Asia, the capital of the Byzantine empire was considered the greatest metropolis of the middle ages. We will study the city through primary texts in translation and examine its surviving monuments and urban landscape. To encourage individual engagement with the city, each student will assume a typical persona drawn from the readings, from whose perspective she or he will observe the city as part of a broader assignment.
Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis

Methods in Byzantine Literature and Philology
CLA 598 / MED 598 / HLS 598

This course emphasizes proficiency in post-Classical and Medieval Greek language through close readings and translations of literature. In addition to surveying the principal genres of literature and the questions surrounding them, it also introduces Ph.D. students to the instrumenta studiorum of Late Antique and Byzantine philology, such as palaeography, codicology, text editing, databases and bibliography.
Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis

Introduction to Jewish Cultures
COM 202 / JDS 203

This introductory course focuses on the cultural syncretism and the global diversity of Jewish experience. It provides a comparative understanding of Jewish culture from antiquity to the present, examining how Jewish culture has emerged through the interaction of Jews and non-Jews, engaging a wide spectrum of cultures throughout the Jewish world, and following representations of key issues such as sexuality or the existence of God in different eras. The course's interdisciplinary approach covers Bible and Talmud, Jewish mysticism, Zionism, Jewish cinema, music, food, modern literature, and graphic arts. All readings and films are in English.
Lital Levy

The World of Late Antiquity
HIS 210 / HLS 210 / CLA 202

This course will focus on the history of the later Roman Empire, a period which historians often refer to as "Late Antiquity." We will begin our class in pagan Rome at the start of the third century and end it in Baghdad in the ninth century: in between these two points, the Mediterranean world experienced a series of cultural and political revolutions whose reverberations can still be felt today. We will witness civil wars, barbarian invasions, the triumph of Christianity over paganism, the fall of the Western Empire, the rise of Islam, the Greco-Arabic translation movement and much more.
Jack Tannous

Europe from Antiquity to 1700
HIS 211

This course shows how Greeks and Romans, Jews and Christians, nobles and merchants built the civilization of the west.
Anthony T. Grafton

Ancient Judaism from Alexander to the Rise of Islam
REL 246 / JDS 246

This course offers an introduction to the development of ancient Judaism during the eventful millennium from the establishment of the Torah as the constitution of the Jewish people in the fifth century BCE--an event that some have seen as marking the transition from biblical religion to Judaism--to the completion of the other great canonical Jewish document, the Babylonian Talmud, in perhaps the sixth century CE.
Martha Himmelfarb

Coptic II: Early Christianity in Late Antique Egypt
REL 401

This course assumes a basic knowledge of Coptic language, and will provide an introduction to early Christianity in Late Antique Egypt. Our starting point will be the Nag Hammadi Library; as such, this course will survey a number of literary genres (letters, gospels, magic, and apocalypse) and sectarian groups (Sethians, Hermetists, and Valentinians) contained in the collection. Depending on student interests, this course will also consider a number of possible topics relating to Late Antique Egypt, such as Manichaeism, monasticism, Neo-Platonism, demonology, ecumenical councils, and indigenous religious beliefs and practices.
Alexander G. Kocar

Studies in Greco-Roman Religions - The Beginning of Late Antiquity
REL 504 / HLS 516

This class examines this influential period, beginning with the celebration of the Roman millennium in the year 247 through the reign of Theodosius I. We study sources pertaining to economy, law, demography, philosophy, social history, and theology in addition to material evidence (archaeological remains, coins, papyri).
AnneMarie Luijendijk

Coptic II: Early Christianity in Late Antique Egypt
REL 550

This course assumes a basic knowledge of Coptic language, and will provide an introduction to early Christianity in Late Antique Egypt. Our starting point will be the Nag Hammadi Library; as such, this course will survey a number of literary genres (letters, gospels, magic, and apocalypse) and sectarian groups (Sethians, Hermetists, and Valentinians) contained in the collection. Depending on student interests, this course will also consider a number of possible topics relating to Late Antique Egypt, such as Manichaeism, monasticism, Neo-Platonism, demonology, ecumenical councils, and indigenous religious beliefs and practices.
Alexander G. Kocar


Spring 2016

Medieval Architecture
ART 315 / ARC 315

A survey of Western architecture and urban design from ca. 300 to ca. 1500 A.D, with a particular emphasis on Italy, Germany, and France. The aim will be to explore the major developments in religious and secular architecture in the West from Early Christian times to the Renaissance. Various aspects of architecture will be considered (patronage, functional requirements, planning, form, structure, construction techniques, symbolism, decoration) with the aim of attaining as complete an understanding as possible of architectural developments and urban design in their historical context.
Alexander K. Harper

Studies in Greco-Roman Religions - Authority, Ritual, and Politics in Early Christianity
REL 504 / HLS 505

Our seminar investigates several major topics (c. 70 C.E.- 500 C.E.), including the following: Authority, "Scriptures," and leadership, seen in comparison with Jewish groups; Rituals, especially exorcism, in context of Greco-Roman cosmology and practices; Constantine's "Christian empire"; Discoveries of "heretical" texts.
Elaine H. Pagels

Religions of Late Antiquity Workshop
REL 526

A weekly, year-long workshop providing students in the Religions of Late Antiquity with the opportunity to present their current research for discussion. Note: REL 525 (fall) and REL 526 (spring) constitute this year-long workshop. In order to receive credit and/or a grade, students must take the course both semesters.
Moulie Vidas


Fall 2015

Medieval Art: Writing on the Image
ART 430 / HLS 430 / MED 430

This seminar investigates the presence of words on images. It will ask how signatures, titles, epigrams, quotations, names, prayers, graffiti and other verbal traces on the surface of the work of art challenge our assumptions of representation, introducing speech acts, memorials, frames, possession, and origins into this visual economy. Our focus will be on Byzantine art, using a range of media: icon, ivory, enamel, manuscript, architecture. No previous knowledge of Byzantine art is necessary. Students will be able to write on non-Byzantine topics.
Charlie Barber

The Roman Empire 31 BC to AD 337
CLA 219 / HIS 219

To study the Roman Empire at its height; to trace the transformation of government from a republican oligarchy to monarchy; to study the changes wrought by multiculturalism on the old unitary society; to trace the rise of Christianity from persecution to dominance; and to assess Rome's contributions in historical context.
Brent D. Shaw

Sex and Salvation in Early Christian Literature
CLA 245 / HLS 244 / GSS 245 / MED 244
   
Why did sex become so prominent in the moral imagination of early Christianity? How did the fate of the soul become so dependent on the sexual discipline of Christians? We will read a wide variety of late antique and early medieval texts which explore, prescribe, and aestheticize physical love and relate its consequences for sin and salvation in later Roman society. The course will emphasize literary as well as social history.
Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis

Problems in Ancient History: Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Numismatics 
CLA 548 / HLS 548 / PAW 548 / ART 532 
 
A seminar covering the basic methodology of numismatics, including die, hoard and archaeological analysis as well as a survey of pre-modern coinages. The Western coinage tradition is covered, from its origins in the Greco-Persian world through classical and Hellenistic Greek coinage, Roman imperial and provincial issues, Parthian and Sasanian issues, the coinage of Byzantium, the Islamic world, and medieval and renaissance Europe. Students research and report on problems involving coinages related to their own areas of specialization. Open to undergraduates by permission of the instructor.
Alan M. Stahl

Europe from Antiquity to 1700
HIS 211   

This course shows how Greeks and Romans, Jews and Christians, nobles and merchants built the civilization of the west.
Anthony T. Grafton

Empire and Catastrophe
HIS 428 / HLS 428 / MED 428 
  
Catastrophe reveals the fragility of human society. This course examines a series of phenomena--plague, famine, war, revolution, economic depression etc.--in order to reach an understanding of humanity's imaginings of but also resilience to collective crises. We shall look in particular at how political forces such as empire have historically both generated and resisted global disasters. Material dealing with the especially fraught centuries at the transition between the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period will be set alongside examples drawn from antiquity as well as our own contemporary era.
Teresa Shawcross

Introduction to Classical Arabic Literature
NES 223 / COM 227
  
An introduction to Classical Arabic Literature from pre-Islamic Arabian poetry to 17th century burlesque tales from Cairo, this course familiarizes you with the authors and texts that shaped the classical Arabic literary heritage. Poetry, tales, and fables will acquaint you with genres such as the qasida, ghazal, and the maqamat, providing a sense of literature at a time when Arabic was the language of writing from Spain to India. Keeping in mind our positionality in relation to the material, we will address questions of genre, periodization, translation, and aesthetic judgment.
Lara Harb

The Islamic World from its Emergence to the Beginnings of Westernization
NES 245 / HIS 245 / MED 245

Begins with the formation of the traditional Islamic world in the 7th century and ends with the first signs of its transformation under Western impact in the 18th century. The core of the course is the history of state formation in the Middle East, but other regions and themes make significant appearances. The course can stand on its own or serve as background to the study of the modern Islamic world.
Michael A. Cook 

Early Christian Biblical Interpretation
NES 344
 
In this seminar, we shall study the ways in which the Christian Bible, comprising the Old and the New Testament, was interpreted in the early Church. After a broad survey of the history of Biblical interpretation to the end of the sixth century, we shall focus on the exegesis of specific Biblical themes (The Creation Narrative; the Story of Cain and Abel; the Sacrifice of Isaac; themes from the Book of Daniel; the Adoration of the Magi; Christ's Entry into Jerusalem; Lazarus and the Rich Man). Primary sources will be read in English translation.
Emmanuel Papoutsakis

Everyday Writing in Medieval Egypt, 600-1500
NES 389

This class explores medieval Islamic history through everyday documents from Egypt: letters, decrees, contracts, court records, and accounts. We will read a wide range of documents in translation, learn to understand them, and use them to evaluate politics, religion, class, commerce, material history, and family relationships in Egypt from just before the Islamic conquests until just before the Ottoman era. We will also consider documents themselves, as historical artifacts and as historical evidence. Why did medieval people produce and preserve written records? And what does history look like when told through documents?
Eve Krakowski

Ancient and Medieval Political Theory
POL 301 / CLA 301 / HLS 303
 
A study of the great works of political theory in four periods: ancient Greece, including Athenian democracy, Thucydides, Plato and Aristotle; ancient Rome from republic to empire, including Polybius, Cicero, Seneca, and Marcus Aurelius; medieval Christian political thought in Augustine, Aquinas, Marsilius, and others; and a brief survey of Renaissance meditations on classical themes. Fundamental topics are examined, including nature and convention; constitutional analysis, including democracy, oligarchy, tyranny, kingship, and the mixed constitution; property, virtue, law, and republicanism; church and state; consent and representation.
Melissa Lane 

Texts in Ancient and Medieval Political Theory
POL 510 / CLA 527 / HLS 509 

This course covers selected ancient and medieval political theory texts in depth, beginning in ancient Greece and ending in the early Renaissance. Authors to be covered include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, and Marsilius. Students are required to attend the twice weekly lectures for POL 301, in addition to a eighty-minute graduate meeting in which secondary as well as primary readings are discussed.
Melissa Lane

Religions of Late Antiquity Workshop
REL 525

A weekly, year-long workshop providing students in the Religions of Late Antiquity with the opportunity to present their current research for discussion. Note: REL 525 (fall) and REL 526 (spring) constitute this year-long workshop. In order to receive credit and/or a grade, students must take the course both semesters.
Moulie Vidas

Medieval Architecture
ART 315 / ARC 315 

A survey of Western architecture and urban design from ca. 300 to ca. 1500 A.D, with a particular emphasis on Italy, Germany, and France. The aim will be to explore the major developments in religious and secular architecture in the West from Early Christian times to the Renaissance. Various aspects of architecture will be considered (patronage, functional requirements, planning, form, structure, construction techniques, symbolism, decoration) with the aim of attaining as complete an understanding as possible of architectural developments and urban design in their historical context.
Alexander K. Harper

Studies in Greco-Roman Religions - Authority, Ritual, and Politics in Early Christianity
REL 504 / HLS 505 

Our seminar investigates several major topics (c. 70 C.E.- 500 C.E.), including the following: Authority, "Scriptures," and leadership, seen in comparison with Jewish groups; Rituals, especially exorcism, in context of Greco-Roman cosmology and practices; Constantine's "Christian empire"; Discoveries of "heretical" texts.
Elaine H. Pagels

Religions of Late Antiquity Workshop
REL 526 

A weekly, year-long workshop providing students in the Religions of Late Antiquity with the opportunity to present their current research for discussion. Note: REL 525 (fall) and REL 526 (spring) constitute this year-long workshop. In order to receive credit and/or a grade, students must take the course both semesters.
Moulie Vidas


Summer 2015

Excavations at Molyvoti in Northern Greece
ART/CLA/HLS 304

A hands-on introduction to the methods and theories of excavation and to the archaeology of ancient Greece. Students participate in a 6-week excavation season, where they will learn how to excavate and survey, and how to record, analyze, and interpret what they find. Onsite training and discussion complemented by seminars, guest lectures, and regional trips.  More information
Helmut Reimitz


Spring 2015

The Roman Empire, 31 B.C. to A.D. 337
CLA 219 / HIS 219  
 
To study the Roman Empire at its height; to trace the transformation of government from a republican oligarchy to despotism; to study the changes wrought by multiculturalism on the old unitary society; to trace the rise of Christianity from persecution to dominance; and to assess Rome's contributions to western civilization.
Edward J. Champlin

Topics in Medieval Greek Literature - Abused, Repentant, Transvestite, Holy Women in Byzantium
CLA 320 / HLS 320 / MED 320 / GSS 320
   
In this course we will read a selection of stories about a new social and religious figure, the female saint. Translated from medieval Greek, these "Lives" of holy women from the later Roman and Byzantine world combine social realism (wives fleeing brutal husbands, girls escaping prostitution, women disguised as monks in order to gain entry into male preserves) with a Christian idealist piety. We will attempt to understand how such literature evolved and why the figure of the female saint escaping the plight of her gender resonated in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.
Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis

The Eagle and the Dragon: Comparing Ancient Rome and Han Empire
CLA 360 / EAS 360 / HUM 360
 
Flourishing contemporaneously between the 3rd century BCE and the 3rd century CE, Rome and the Han controlled much of the Eurasian landmass. What does juxtaposing the two reveal about each and the possibilities of historical comparison more broadly? By focusing on common themes (including kingship, administration, society, material culture), we draw upon a range of approaches to introduce both empires and a core problem in historical enquiry. Unlike most comparative histories, we also pay close attention to how ancient participants in empire perceived, portrayed, and theorized their worlds, and the ways ideas shaped their imperial projects.
Tineke M. D'Haeseleer Matthew M. McCarty 

Problems in Greek Literature - Ancient Prose Fiction
CLA 514 / COM 524   

A survey of Greek prose fiction with the aim of exploring the structures, techniques, themes, influences, and preoccupations of the ancient novel/romance in its cultural and historical contexts. Attention to theories of the genre and its development in the expanded borders of the Greek world from the Hellenistic period to late antiquity. We will focus primarily on Chariton, Achilles Tatius, Longus, and Heliodorus, with attention, if interest warrants it to the Roman examples of Petronius and Apuleius. Appropriate secondary readings, including Bakhtin, Foucault, Goldhill, Konstan, Whitmarsh, Morales, Morgan.
Froma I. Zeitlin

Roman History - Problems and Methods
CLA 524
  
A seminar that introduces graduate students to current methods and debates in Roman history and historiography. Provides a chronological overview of the history of Rome and her expanding empire from the early Republic (5th century BC) to the end of the empire in the West (5th-6th centuries AD), accompanied by the study of a wide variety of ancient sources, including texts, inscriptions, coins, material culture, art, and archaeology, and the methods commonly used by modern historians to analyze them. Students acquire the basic tools needed to do research in Roman history.
Brent D. Shaw

The World of Late Antiquity
HIS 210/HLS 210/CLA 202

This course will focus on the history of the later Roman Empire, a period which historians often refer to as "Late Antiquity." We will begin our class in pagan Rome at the start of the third century and end it in Baghdad in the ninth century: in between these two points, the Mediterranean world experienced a series of cultural and political revolutions whose reverberations can still be felt today. We will witness civil wars, barbarian invasions, the triumph of Christianity over paganism, the fall of the Western Empire, the rise of Islam, the Greco-Arabic translation movement and much more.
Jack B. Tannous

The Origins of the Middle Ages
HIS 543/HLS 543

This seminar explores the transition from the late ancient to the medieval world through the lens of law and legal practice from the late Roman to the Carolingian empire. We will look at how the different codifications built on earlier legal models and traditions but adopted and adapted them in their respective circumstances. We will explore these processes until the ninth century when the Carolingian rulers came to rule an Empire which comprised a variety of different Roman and post Roman legal traditions and laws and were confronted with the challenge to find new ways and strategies for their coexistence, compatibility and convergence.
Helmut Reimitz

Monotheism and Society from Constantine to Harun al-Rashid
HIS 555 / HLS 555 

The goal of this seminar will be to introduce students to some of the most important ideas and debates surrounding the two major religious revolutions of Late Antiquity: the triumph of Christianity and the subsequent emergence and world conquests of Islam. The course will focus on extensive reading in both primary and secondary literature and students will be introduced to and trained in using major instrumenta studiorum for this period; texts may also be read in Greek, Syriac, and Arabic. No prior knowledge of Late Antiquity, Christianity, or Islam will be assumed.
Jack Tannous

Christianity Along the Silk Road
NES 325/HIS 338/HLS 323

Syriac is a dialect of Aramaic very similar to the language spoken by Jesus in first-century Palestine. Aramaic-speaking Christians in the Near East soon adopted Syriac as their literary language; by the early fourteenth century, Syriac Christianity spread from the western Mediterranean to China. In this seminar we shall be exploring the origins of Syriac Christianity in the Near East and its spread along the Silk Road before 1500.
Emmanuel Papoutsakis

Ancient Judaism from Alexander to the Rise of Islam
REL 246 / JDS 246 
  
This course offers an introduction to the development of ancient Judaism during the eventful millennium from the establishment of the Torah as the constitution of the Jewish people in the fifth century BCE--an event that some have seen as marking the transition from biblical religion to Judaism--to the completion of the other great canonical Jewish document, the Babylonian Talmud, in perhaps the sixth century CE.
Martha Himmelfarb

Studies in Greco-Roman Religions - Ritual and Liturgy in Late Antiquity
REL 504/HLS 504

How did people in Late Antiquity worship? What happened in a temple, synagogue, church or shrine? What at home? What did people say and do? How did ritual experts and laypeople act and interact? What practices surrounded birth, marriage, travel, illness, feasts and death? Who prays, sings hymns, reads scripture? What is our evidence for every day (and idealized) practices and where are the biases in the evidence? What changes in ritual and liturgy this period and why? We will examine a range of primary sources (literary, papyrological, archaeological), historical scholarship and theoretical writings.
AnneMarie Luijendijk


Fall 2014

Medieval Greek Literature
CLA 320 / HLS 320 / MED 320

The subject of this course will be medieval Greek Romantic fiction. We will read translations of the four surviving novels written in twelfth-century Constantinople in a bid to answer questions about the link between eroticism and the novel, truth and invention in the middle ages, who read fiction and why, and what role, if any, did the medieval or Byzantine Romances have in the story of the European novel. Above all, we will seek to recover some of the pleasure felt by the medieval readers and audiences of these novels.
Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis

Topics in Ancient History - Slavery in the Roman World
CLA 326 / HIS 326 / REL 329 

This course considers the problem of slavery in the Roman world, from the early Republic to the end of the Empire. There will be some coverage of the background developments in the slave system under the earlier age of the Greek city-states. A wide range of subjects concerning slavery in Roman society will be considered including the causes of the creation of the Roman slave system, the ways in which it was maintained, its main social and economic functions, and the problem of resistance to servitude.
Brent D. Shaw

Problems in Greek History - Classical and Hellenistic Inscriptions
CLA 521 
 
Greek inscriptions provide especially valuable information on the political life, institutions and social structures of Greek society. The aim of the course is to give an introduction to the use of epigraphic documents in historical research. The sessions are devoted to the analysis of particular aspects of Greek society (e. g. relationships between city and country, king and city, Greeks and non-Greeks) on the basis of inscriptions from the Classical and Hellenistic periods.
Marc Domingo Gygax

Problems in Ancient History - Politics & Religion
CLA 547 / PAW 503 / HLS 547 / ART 534 
 
This interdisciplinary seminar explores the intersection of politics and religion in the ancient world. The special case to be studied, exempli gratia, will be Augustus' Res Gestae, although individual projects may range across the Mediterranean throughout Antiquity, and may focus on any form of surviving evidence (historical, literary, monumental, numismatic, etc.).
Edward J. Champlin  Michael Koortbojian

Problems in Ancient History - Ancient and Medieval Numismatics
CLA 548 / HLS 548 / PAW 548 / ART 532 

A seminar covering the basic methodology of numismatics, including die, hoard and archaeological analysis. The Western coinage tradition is covered, from its origins in the Greco-Persian world through classical and Hellenistic Greek coinage, Roman imperial and provincial issues, the coinage of Byzantium, the Islamic world and medieval and renaissance Europe. Students research and report on problems involving coinages related to their own areas of specialization. Open to undergraduates by permission of the instructor.
Alan Stahl

Introduction to Post-Classical Greek from the Late Antique to the Byzantine Era
CLG 240/HLS 240

This course will focus on the Greek Bible and the emergence of a 'common' Greek language. We will read excerpts from the Septuagint (the Greek transl. of the Hebrew bible) and from the New Testament in order to understand how Greek evolved from the time of Alexander the Great to the Roman emperors so as to become the 'common tongue' (koinê) of a Hellenized eastern Mediterranean world of Jews, Pagans, and Christians.
Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis

HIS 343/CLA 343/HLS 343
The Civilization of the Early Middle Ages

This course will survey the "Dark Ages" from the end of the Roman Empire to the end of the first millennium (ca. 400-1000 AD), often seen as a time of cultural and political decline, recently even labelled as the "end of civilization". The complex political and social landscape of the Roman Empire, however, had more to offer than just to end. This course will outline how early medieval people(s) in the successor states of the Roman Empire used its resources to form new communities and will suggest to understand the "Dark Ages" as a time of lively social and cultural experimentation, that created the social and political frameworks of Europe.
Helmut Reimitz

Empire and Catastrophe
HIS 428 / HLS 428 / MED 428
  
Catastrophe reveals the fragility of human society. This course examines a series of phenomena--plague, famine, war, revolution, economic depression etc.--in order to reach an understanding of humanity's imaginings of but also resilience to collective crises. We shall look in particular at how political forces such as empire have historically both generated and resisted global disasters. Material dealing with the especially fraught centuries at the transition between the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period will be set alongside examples drawn from antiquity as well as our own contemporary era.
Teresa Shawcross

The World of the Middle Ages
MED 227 / HUM 227  

An introduction to medieval culture in Western Europe from the end of the classical world to ca. 1400. The course focuses on themes such as the medieval concepts of self, humanity, and God; nation-building, conquest and crusade; relations among Christians, Jews, and Moslems; literacy, heresy, and the rise of vernacular literature; gender, chivalry, and the medieval court. Material approached through various cultural forms and media; some lectures by invited guest lecturers. Seminar discussion format with some lecturing.
Sara S. Poor

The Islamic World from its Emergence to the Beginnings of Westernization
NES 245/HIS 245/MED 245

Begins with the formation of the traditional Islamic world in the seventh century and ends with the first signs of its transformation under Western impact in the 18th century. The core of the course is the history of state formation in the Middle East, but other regions and themes make significant appearances. The course can stand on its own or serve as background to the study of the modern Islamic world.
Michael A Cook

Early Christian Biblical Interpretation
NES 344

In this seminar, we shall study the ways in which the Christian Bible, comprising the Old and the New Testament, was interpreted in the early Church. After a broad survey of the history of Biblical interpretation to the end of the sixth century, we shall focus on the exegesis of specific Biblical themes (The Creation Narrative; the Story of Cain and Abel; the Sacrifice of Isaac; themes from the Book of Daniel; the Adoration of the Magi; Christ's Entry into Jerusalem; Lazarus and the Rich Man). Primary sources will be read in English translation.
Emmanuel Papoutsakis

Readings in Classical Arabic Literature
NES 531
  
A reading of selections of poetry and prose. Problems of narrative, poetics, and the like may be discussed according to the interests of the class.
Andras P. Hamori

Studies in Greco-Roman Religions - Community Formation in Early Christian Sources
REL 504 / CLA 516 / HLS 505  

Course focuses on basic primary sources, both Greek and Latin, that offer evidence for the early history of Christianity (100-400 CE). To allow for breadth of reading and to include participants from various departments, one may read primarily in English, with reference to the original texts as necessary.
Elaine Pagels

Studies in Ancient Judaism - Apocalyptic Literature of the Byzantine Era
REL 513 / HLS 510

The events of the seventh century--the wars between Byzantium & Persia followed by the Muslim conquest--seemed to some Jews to signal that the messianic age was about to dawn. From a very different angle of vision Christians felt called upon to explain the significance of the Muslim conquest for their eschatological expectations. This course considers the literature produced by Jews and Christians in response to these events & the impact of Jewish & Christian texts & traditions on each other against the background of earlier Jewish & Christian apocalyptic literature & the messianic expectations of the centuries before the rise of Islam.
Martha Himmelfarb 


Spring 2014

The Civilization of the Early Middle Ages
HIS 343

This course will survey the "Dark Ages" from the end of the Roman Empire to the end of the first millennium (ca. 400-1000 AD), often seen as a time of cultural and political decline, recently even labelled as the "end of civilization". The complex political and social landscape of the Roman Empire, however, had more to offer than just to end. This course will outline how early medieval people(s) in the successor states of the Roman Empire used its resources to form new communities and will suggest to understand the "Dark Ages" as a time of lively social and cultural experimentation, that created the social and political frameworks of Europe.
Helmut Reimitz

Themes in Islamic Culture - History 600-1800
NES 503

This year the course will be a seminar on Islamic history from 600 to 1800 intended to prepare students for Generals and for eventually teaching such a course.
Michael A. Cook


Fall 2013

HIS 543/HLS 543
The Origins of the Middle Ages:  History, Law and the Bible in the early Middle Ages

This seminar explores the transition from the late ancient to the medieval world through the lens of the historians of the time. What role did the writing of history play in understanding social change? Which preexisting historical models or texts were used, how were they reconfigured, and what new ones were created in order to respond to the fundamental social changes? How did the writing of history not only reflect but also encourage social change? The course explores these processes and introduces students of late antique and medieval studies to techniques such as codicology, palaeography, and the art of editing.
Helmut Reimitz

An Introduction to the Islamic Scholarly Tradition
NES 502

The course offers a hands-on introduction to such basic genres of medieval scholarship as biography, history, tradition, and Koranic exegesis, taught through the intensive reading of texts, mostly in Arabic. The syllabus varies according to the interests of the students and the instructor.
Michael A. Cook

Introduction to Medieval Latin
LAT 232

Selections from Medieval Latin prose and poetry, with emphasis on Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. Attention to developments in Latin in the period, as well as to the transmission and reception of the literature and values of Classical Antiquity.
Brent Shaw


Spring 2012

HIS 343 The Civilization of the Early Middle Ages
Helmut Reimitz

HIS 543 Historiography and Identity from late Antiquity to the Middle Ages
Helmut Reimitz

 


2001-2011
Regular offerings

ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

ART 100 – Introduction to the History of Art, Ancient to Medieval.

ART 201/ARC 205 – Roman Architecture.

ART 203 – Roman Art.

ART 204/HLS 204 – Pagans and Christians: Urbanism, Architecture and Art of Late Antiquity.

ART 205 – Medieval Art in Europe.

ART 206/HLS 206 – Byzantine Art and Architecture.

ART 232/NES 232– The Arts of the Islamic World.

ART 310/NES 309 - Introduction to Painting and Book Illumination of the Islamic World.

ART 312 – The Arts of Medieval Europe.

ART 315/ARC 315 – Medieval Architecture.

ART 320/ARC 320 – Rome, the Eternal City.

ART 430, 432 – Seminar, Medieval Art. See Topical Courses for past examples.

ART 435, 436 – Topics in Medieval Art, Architecture, and Theory. See Topical Courses for past examples.

ART 535 – Problems in Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Architecture. See Topical Courses for past examples.

ART 580/NES 580 – Great Cities of the Islamic World.

ART 585 – Problems in Islamic Art and Archaeology. See Topical Courses for past examples.

 

CLASSICAL GREEK

CLG 240/HLS 240 – Introduction to Postclassical Greek from the Late Antique to the Byzantine Era.

 

CLASSICS

CLA 219/HIS 219 – The Roman Empire, 31 B.C to A.D. 337.

CLA 325/HIS 329 – Roman Law.

CLA 326, 327/HIS 326, 327 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 522 – Problems in Greek History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 542 – Problems in Latin Literature. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 545 – Problems in Roman History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 546, 547 – Problems in Ancient History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 548/HLS 528 – Ancient and Medieval Numismatics.

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COM 205/HUM 205 – The Classical Roots of Western Literature.

COM 543 – Topics in Medieval Literature. See Topical Courses for past examples.

 

HELLENIC STUDIES

HLS 362/NES 362 - Special Topics in Byzantine Civilization. See Topical Courses for past examples.

HLS 500 – Topics in Hellenic Studies. See  Topical Courses for past examples

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

 

HISTORY

HIS 211 – Europe from Antiquity to 1700.

HIS 236/HLS 236 – The Greeks: History of a People.

EAS 336/HIS 319 – The Making and Transformation of Medieval China, 300-1200.

HIS 330/HLS 330 – The Muslim Mediterranean.

HIS 343/CLA 343 – The Civilization of the Early Middle Ages.

HIS 355/HLS 355 – Transformation of the Ancient World: Byzantium, 500-1200.

HIS 400 – Junior seminar in history. See Topical Courses for past examples.

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

HIS 543 – The Origins of the Middle Ages.

HIS 545, 546 – Readings in Renaissance and Reformation History. See Topical Courses for past examples related to Late Antiquity.

 

LATIN

LAT 232 – Introduction to Medieval Latin.

 

NEAR EASTERN STUDIES

NES 201/HIS 223 – Introduction to the Middle East.

NES 220/HIS 220 – Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Middle Ages.

NES 245/HIS 245 – The Islamic World from its Emergence to the Beginnings of Westernization..

SPA 308/NES 308 – Spanish Islam, A.D. 711-1492.

NES 323 – Introduction to Early Sufism (c. AD 800-1200).

NES 325/REL 325 – Christianity along the Silk Road.

NES 502 – An Introduction to the Islamic Scholarly Tradition.

NES 503 – Themes in Islamic History and Culture.

NES 515 – Introduction to Syriac.

NES 517 – Syriac Prose Writings.

NES 523 – Readings in Judeo-Arabic.

NES 524 – Introduction to Classical Armenian.

NES 531, 532 – Readings in Classical Arabic Literature.

NES 545 – Problems in Near Eastern Jewish History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

NES 547 – Intermediate Syriac.

NES 566 – Intermediate Armenian.

NES 590 – Syriac Studies Seminar. See Topical Courses for past examples.

           

PROGRAM IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

PAW 501 – Program Seminar. See Topical Courses for past examples.

 

RELIGION

NES 240/REL 240 – Muslims and the Qur’an.

REL 251 – The New Testament and Christian Origins.

REL 252 – The Early Christian Movement.

REL 335/NES 356 – Moses and Jesus in the Islamic Tradition.

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions. See Topical Courses for past examples.

REL 509 – Studies in the History of Islam. See Topical Courses for past examples
 

Topical/one-time courses

ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

ART 398/HLS 398 – The Byzantine Commonwealth, Then and Now. (F 2005)

ART 430 – Seminar, Medieval Art: Death and Salvation. (F2004)

ART 430 – Seminar, Medieval Art: Byzantine Monasteries. (F 2006)

ART 430 – Seminar, Medieval Art: The Other “Romanesque.” (F 2007)

ART 430 – Seminar, Medieval Art: Belfry and Minaret. (F 2008)

ART 432/CLA 432/HLS 432 – Island of Cultures: Sicily from the Greeks to the Normans. ( F 2009)

ART 435 –The Arts of Pilgrimage in the Middle Ages. ( S 2005)

ART 436 – Topics in Medieval Art, Architecture, and Theory: Concepts for the Depiction of God.  (S 2007, S 2011)

ART 438/NES 428 – Representations of Faith and Power: Islamic Architecture in Its Context. (F 2007)

ART 439 – Illuminations: Monuments of Medieval Art in Form and Theory. ( F 2004)

ART 499/HLS 499 – Architecture as Icon. (S 2010)

ART 513 – Seminar in Roman Art: Roman Triumphal Monuments. (S 2010)

ART 520 – Greek Art of the Iron Age and Orientalizing Periods. ( S 2007)

ART 531 – Roman Painting and Mosaic. ( S 2005)

ART 535 – Problems in Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Architecture: The Byzantine House (4th-15th cent.). (S 2004)

ART 535/HLS 535 – Problems in Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Architecture: Accessing Saints in the Eastern Christian World (ca. 300-ca.-1500). (S 2005)

ART 535/HLS 535 – Juncture of Heaven and Earth: The Monastery of St. Catherine on Mount Sinai. (S 2006)

ART 535 – Architecture as Icon. (S 2010)

ART 537 – Seminar in Medieval Art: Medieval Image/Concepts of Authenticity. ( S 2008)

ART 537/MED 500 – Seminar in Medieval Art: Medieval Images of Visionary Experience. (F 2009)

ART 539 – Seminar in Iconography. (F 2004)

ART 585 – Problems in Islamic Art and Archeology. ( S 2004)

 

CLASSICS

CLA 235/HLS 235 – Antiquity after Antiquity: Homer. ( S 2007)

CLA 326/HIS 326 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion: Slavery in the Roman World. (S 2005, F 2008)

CLA 326/HIS 326 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion: Religion in Roman Society. (S 2006, F 2010)

CLA 327/HIS 327 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion: Women in Ancient Rome. (S 2004, S 2008)

CLA 327/HIS 327 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion: How the Classics Became the Classics. (S 2008)

CLA 345 – Ancient Greco-Roman Medicine. (S 2009)

CLA 522- Problems in Greek History: The Greek East in the Roman Era.  (S 2007)

CLA 526 –Animals in Ancient Science and Medicine: Theories, Practices, Contexts. (S 2011)

CLA 541 – Survey of Early Medieval Latin Literature. ( S 2008)

CLA 542 – Problems in Latin Literature: Greek and Latin Textual Criticism. (S 2010)

CLA 545 – Problems in Roman History: Economies of Empire. (F 2004, S 2005)

CLA 545 – Problems in Roman History: Africa and Empire. (S 2006)

CLA 546 – Problems in Roman History: The Roman Family. (S 2008)

CLA 547/PAW 501 – Problems in Ancient History: Priests and Power in the Ancient World. (F 2004)

CLA 547/PAW 501 – Problems in Ancient History: Belief and Faith in Ancient Religions. (F 2006)

CLA 547/PAW 501 – Problems in Ancient History: The Language of the Gods: Prophecy, Oracles and Divination. (F 2007)

CLA 547 – Problems in Ancient History: Sacred Specialists in Ancient Societies. ( F 2010)

CLA 552 – Virgil and His Epic in the Middle Ages. (F 2005)

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COM 224/REL 290 – Representing the Queen of Sheba in the Islamic, Jewish, and Christian Traditions. (F 2009)

COM 311/MED 311 – Reading Medieval Culture. (S 2004)

COM 329/NES 326 – The Thousand and One Nights. ( S 2005)

COM 417/NES 417 – Genre East and West: A History of Literature of the Ancient Near East. ( S 2006)

COM 543 – Topics in Medieval Literature: Medieval Allegory. (S 2004)

COM 543 – Topics in Medieval Literature: The Medieval Voice. (S 2008)

 

HELLENIC STUDIES

HLS 362/NES 362 - Special Topics in Byzantine Civilization. Empires in Transition. (S 2004)

HLS 500/CLA 529 – Topics in Hellenic Studies: Rhetorical and Theatrical Performance in the Late Antique Greek World. (S 2001)

HLS 500/HIS 512 – Topics in Hellenic Studies: Greek Palaeography. (S 2007)

 

HISTORY

HIS 437/HLS 437 – Byzantium in the 10th Century: The Age of Reconquest. (S 2007, S 2008)

HIS 395 – History of Medicine and the Body. (S 2010)

HIS 400 – Junior seminar: The Mediterranean in History. (F 2004, F 2005)

HIS 400 – Junior seminar: The Afterlife of Antiquity in the Greek & Arabic Middle Ages. (F 2006)

HIS 423/HLS 423 – State and Ideology in Eastern Europe: From Byzantium to the Enlightenment. (S 2006)

HIS 435 – Mounted Nomads and Sedentary States in the Medieval World. (S 2010)

HIS 443/JDS 443 – Jewish History through the Middle Ages. (F 2005)

HIS 444/JDS 444 – The Bible in History. (F 2007)

HIS 445 – Medieval Saints and Society. (F 2010)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: The Formation of Byzantium, 600-850. (F 2006, F 2010)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: Byzantium and the Crusades. ( F 2009)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: Byzantium in the 10th Century: The Age of Reconquest. (F 2008)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: Introduction to Byzantine Studies. (S 2008)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: Rethinking the 11th Century in Byzantium. (F 2007)

HIS 545, 546 – Readings in Renaissance and Reformation History: Visions of the Past in Early Modern Europe. (S 2006, F 2008)

HIS 546 – Reception of the Classical Tradition. (S 2011)

 

NEAR EASTERN STUDIES

NES 225 – What Happened in History? ( S 2001, S2003)

NES 235/REL 235 – In the Shadow of Swords: Martyrdom and Holy War in Islam. (F 2009)

NES 237/REL 237 – The Medieval Islamic World. (F 2003)

NES 355/JDS 355 – Between Swords and Stones: Jerusalem, a History. (S 2010, S 2011)

NES 420 – Church and State in Late Antiquity. (F 2010)

NES 430/REL 439 – Qur’an in English. (S 2008)

NES 447 – Qur’anic Commentary. (S 2009)

NES 510 – Julian the Apostate in Syriac Sources. (F 2007)

NES 522 – Readings in Classical Arab Historians and Biographers. (S 2001, S 2003)

NES 533 – Syriac Hagiography. (F 2009)

NES 545 – Problems in Near Eastern Jewish History. (S 2004)

NES 545 – Problems in Near Eastern Jewish History. (S 2005, S 2007)

NES 545 – Problems in Near Eastern Jewish History: “Autonomy, Community, and Leadership.” (S 2006)

NES 546 – Concepts of Knowledge in Classical Islam. (S 2004)

NES 590 – Syriac Poetry and Homiletic Literature. (S 2004)

NES 592 – Symbols and Allegory in Medieval Islamic Art. (S 2004)

NES 599 – Syriac Biblical Interpretations. (F 2006)

 

PROGRAM IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

PAW 501 – Program Seminar: Cultural History of Syria: From the Late Bronze Age to Early Islam. (F  2005)

 

RELIGION

REL 253/WOM 253 – Early Christian Women: From Mary Magdalen to Martyred Mothers. ( S 2007)

REL 256 – Sacred Space and Christianity. (S 2008)

REL 270 – Christianity in the Medieval Millennium, c. 476-1453. (F 2009)

REL 301/HLS301 – Eastern Orthodox Christianity. (F 2010)

REL 312 – Augustine and Aquinas. (F 2008)

REL 330/NES 349 – Magic and Miracles in the Lands of Islam. ( S 2007)

REL 341/JDS 341 – Christianity and the Rabbis in Late Antiquity. (S 2004)

REL 343 – Jews, Gentiles, and Christians in the Ancient World. (F 2001, F 2004)

REL 350 – God, Satan, Demons, Angels: Invisible Beings, Identity and Politics. (S 2003)

REL 372/JDS 372 – God’s Body: Hebrew Bible, Rabbinic Literature, and Jewish Mysticism. (S 2008)

REL 385 - Spiritual Exercises: Classics of Christian Spirituality. (F 2008)

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions: Genres of Rabbinic Literature. (F 2004)

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions. (S 2008)

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions: Constructions of Identity in Late Antiquity – Josephus and Eusebius. ( S 2004)

REL 504/HLS 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions: Literary and Documentary Papyrology. (S 2007, F 2009)

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions: Varieties of Early Christianity. (S 2009)

REL 507 – Studies in Religion and Philosophy: Augustine and Political Augustinianisms. (S 2011)

REL 508 – Studies in Religion and Morality: Augustine and Aquinas. (S2006)

REL 509 – Studies in the History of Islam: Historiography of Religion and Society. (F 2003)

REL 509 – Studies in the History of Islam: Medieval Islamic Narrative and Modern Historiography. (F 2004, S 2006)

REL 510 – Special Topics in the Study of Religion: Rabbinic Cosmology and Its Contexts. ( S 2004)

REL 512 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions. (S 2007)

REL 525 – Religions of Late Antiquity Workshop. (F 2010)