Archives

Fall 2015

The Islamic World from its Emergence to the Beginnings of Westernization
NES 245 / HIS 245 / MED 245

Begins with the formation of the traditional Islamic world in the 7th century and ends with the first signs of its transformation under Western impact in the 18th century. The core of the course is the history of state formation in the Middle East, but other regions and themes make significant appearances. The course can stand on its own or serve as background to the study of the modern Islamic world.
Michael A. Cook 

An Introduction to the Islamic Scholarly Tradition
NEW 502/MED 502

The course offers a hands-on introduction to such basic genres of medieval scholarship as biography, history, tradition, and Koranic exegesis, taught through the intensive reading of texts, mostly in Arabic. The syllabus varies according to the interests of the students and the instructor.
Michael A Cook
 


Summer 2015

Excavations at Molyvoti in Northern Greece
ART/CLA/HLS 304

A hands-on introduction to the methods and theories of excavation and to the archaeology of ancient Greece. Students participate in a 6-week excavation season, where they will learn how to excavate and survey, and how to record, analyze, and interpret what they find. Onsite training and discussion complemented by seminars, guest lectures, and regional trips.  More information
Helmut Reimitz


Spring 2015

Introduction to Archaeology
ART 401

An introduction to the history, methodologies, and theories of archaeology. The seminar discusses topics and problems drawn from a wide range of cultures and periods. Issues include trade and exchange; the origins of agriculture; cognitive archaeology (the study of the mind); biblical archaeology (the use of texts); artifacts in their cultural contexts; and the politics of the past. Emphasis on what constitutes archaeological evidence, and how it may be used. Required for majors concentrating in archaeology; open to all. No prerequisites
Nathan T. Arrington

Antioch Through the Ages
ART 418/CLA 418/HLS 418
Antioch has been a major point of contact between the Mediterranean region and Asia from ancient times to the present. Students in this new course will get exclusive access to the artifacts and records of Princeton's Antioch excavations of the 1930s and will read and discuss sources and studies on the history of the city from its Hellenistic origins to recent activity by ISIS in the area. Attention will be paid to the city's geological setting and changes in its cultural identity and ecological environment. Each student will work on a research project, and all students will collaborate on the production of a public website about Antioch.
Alan M. Stahl, Seminar 1:30-4:20 pm W

The World of Late Antiquity
HIS 210/HLS 210/CLA 202

This course will focus on the history of the later Roman Empire, a period which historians often refer to as "Late Antiquity." We will begin our class in pagan Rome at the start of the third century and end it in Baghdad in the ninth century: in between these two points, the Mediterranean world experienced a series of cultural and political revolutions whose reverberations can still be felt today. We will witness civil wars, barbarian invasions, the triumph of Christianity over paganism, the fall of the Western Empire, the rise of Islam, the Greco-Arabic translation movement and much more.
Jack B. Tannous

The Origins of the Middle Ages
HIS 543/HLS 543

This seminar explores the transition from the late ancient to the medieval world through the lens of law and legal practice from the late Roman to the Carolingian empire. We will look at how the different codifications built on earlier legal models and traditions but adopted and adapted them in their respective circumstances. We will explore these processes until the ninth century when the Carolingian rulers came to rule an Empire which comprised a variety of different Roman and post Roman legal traditions and laws and were confronted with the challenge to find new ways and strategies for their coexistence, compatibility and convergence.
Helmut Reimitz

Christianity Along the Silk Road
NES 325/HIS 338/HLS 323

Syriac is a dialect of Aramaic very similar to the language spoken by Jesus in first-century Palestine. Aramaic-speaking Christians in the Near East soon adopted Syriac as their literary language; by the early fourteenth century, Syriac Christianity spread from the western Mediterranean to China. In this seminar we shall be exploring the origins of Syriac Christianity in the Near East and its spread along the Silk Road before 1500.
Emmanuel Papoutsakis

Themes in Islamic Culture - Middle Eastern History
NES 503

This semester the course will be a chapter and paper clinic. Each participant will be expected to submit at least one draft chapter or paper to the seminar, and will receive intensive comments and suggestions on both form and substance from the other participants and the instructor. Chapters and papers may relate to any period or aspect of Middle Eastern or Islamic history.
Michael A Cook

The New Testament and Christian Origins
REL 251

To trace the origins of Christianity from its beginnings as a movement within ancient Judaism to its gradual transformation and emergence as an independent religious movement in the Roman Empire and beyond. To read the New Testament with a critical eye, i.e., as a collection of documents illustrating differing emphases and stages in the growth of early Christianity.
John G. Gager

Jesus of Nazareth: Ancient Controversies, New Interpretations
REL 352

We'll investigate the earliest known sources about Jesus--New Testament gospels and "gnostic gospels", including the Gospel of Thomas, Mary Magdalene, and Philip; then check sources written by Jewish and Roman outsiders to the movement to see what they say about the actual historical context and how various people interpret Jesus (as revolutionary, healer, rabbi, prophet, magician, God). We'll also look at interpretations of Jesus in film, art, theater, fiction, and other contemporary sources, including those suggested by seminar members.
Elaine H. Pagels

Studies in Greco-Roman Religions - Ritual and Liturgy in Late Antiquity
REL 504/HLS 504

How did people in Late Antiquity worship? What happened in a temple, synagogue, church or shrine? What at home? What did people say and do? How did ritual experts and laypeople act and interact? What practices surrounded birth, marriage, travel, illness, feasts and death? Who prays, sings hymns, reads scripture? What is our evidence for every day (and idealized) practices and where are the biases in the evidence? What changes in ritual and liturgy this period and why? We will examine a range of primary sources (literary, papyrological, archaeological), historical scholarship and theoretical writings.
AnneMarie Luijendijk


Fall 2014

Problems in Greek & Roman Philosophy: Isocrates, Against the Sophists
CLA 526/HLS 527

Eminent educator and rhetorician, influential political thinker, and arch-enemy of Plato, Isocrates was a towering intellectual figure of 4th century Greece. After a brief introduction to the political situation and cultural developments after the Peloponnesian War, this seminar focuses on a close reading of two or three of Isocrates' major philosophical speeches, Oration 13 Against the Sophists, Oration 10, Encomium of Helen, and Oration 11, Busiris.
Christian Wildberg

Introduction to Post-Classical Greek from the Late Antique to the Byzantine Era
CLG 240/HLS 240

This course will focus on the Greek Bible and the emergence of a 'common' Greek language. We will read excerpts from the Septuagint (the Greek transl. of the Hebrew bible) and from the New Testament in order to understand how Greek evolved from the time of Alexander the Great to the Roman emperors so as to become the 'common tongue' (koinê) of a Hellenized eastern Mediterranean world of Jews, Pagans, and Christians.
Emmanuel C. Bourbouhakis

Europe from Antiquity to 1700
HIS 211

This course shows how Greeks and Romans, Jews and Christians, nobles and merchants built the civilization of the west.
Anthony T. Grafton

HIS 343/CLA 343/HLS 343
The Civilization of the Early Middle Ages

This course will survey the "Dark Ages" from the end of the Roman Empire to the end of the first millennium (ca. 400-1000 AD), often seen as a time of cultural and political decline, recently even labelled as the "end of civilization". The complex political and social landscape of the Roman Empire, however, had more to offer than just to end. This course will outline how early medieval people(s) in the successor states of the Roman Empire used its resources to form new communities and will suggest to understand the "Dark Ages" as a time of lively social and cultural experimentation, that created the social and political frameworks of Europe.
Helmut Reimitz

Problems in Byzantine History: Formation of Byzantium 600-850: Sources & Problems
HIS 542/HLS 542/MED 542

Between the later sixth century and the middle of the ninth century eastern Roman state, society and culture experienced a series of substantial transformations which resulted in what we call today 'Byzantium'. This course looks at some of the key sources for this process and analyses both the ways in which they have been interpreted and the questions those interpretations raise. Particular attention will be paid to the issues associated with relating written textual evidence to archaeological data and interpretation.
John F. Haldon

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Western Culture I: Literature and the Arts
HUM 216, 217

This course, along with HUM 217, form the first part of an intensive yearlong exploration of the landmark achievements of the Western intellectual tradition. With an interdisciplinary team of faculty drawn from the humanities and social sciences, students examine pivotal texts, events, and artifacts of European civilization from antiquity to the middle ages as part of an ongoing cultural conversation. The course is enhanced by guest lectures and cultural excursions to museums, concerts, and plays. The two courses, taken together, total six hours a week and fulfill distribution requirements in both LA and HA.

The Islamic World from its Emergence to the Beginnings of Westernization
NES 245/HIS 245/MED 245

Begins with the formation of the traditional Islamic world in the seventh century and ends with the first signs of its transformation under Western impact in the 18th century. The core of the course is the history of state formation in the Middle East, but other regions and themes make significant appearances. The course can stand on its own or serve as background to the study of the modern Islamic world.
Michael A Cook

Early Christian Biblical Interpretation
NES 344

In this seminar, we shall study the ways in which the Christian Bible, comprising the Old and the New Testament, was interpreted in the early Church. After a broad survey of the history of Biblical interpretation to the end of the sixth century, we shall focus on the exegesis of specific Biblical themes (The Creation Narrative; the Story of Cain and Abel; the Sacrifice of Isaac; themes from the Book of Daniel; the Adoration of the Magi; Christ's Entry into Jerusalem; Lazarus and the Rich Man). Primary sources will be read in English translation.
Emmanuel Papoutsakis

An Introduction to the Islamic Scholarly Tradition
NES 502/MED 502

The course offers a hands-on introduction to such basic genres of medieval scholarship as biography, history, tradition, and Koranic exegesis, taught through the intensive reading of texts, mostly in Arabic. The syllabus varies according to the interests of the students and the instructor.
Michael A. Cook

From Jesus to Constantine: How Christianity Began
REL 252

How did the movement that began with a few followers of Jesus of Nazareth become a world religion? We will investigate the earliest primary sources, gospels & historical accounts, Jewish & Roman, showing what was known about Jesus--including secret gospels; letters written to & from Roman emperors about whether to kill Christians to stop the movement; first-hand accounts of trials, prison diaries, & martyrdoms; what Jesus & Paul said about sexual practices & gender; what converts wrote about why they chose Christianity, despite the dangers; how emperor Constantine--and, shortly after, Augustine--influenced what we know as Christianity today.
Elaine H. Pagels

The Apostle Paul in Text and Context: His Letters, His Communities, and His Interpreters
REL 355/HLS 356

In this seminar we will: 1) study the New Testament letters of the apostle Paul in their first-century context and their earliest interpretations; and 2) explore recent trends in Pauline scholarship, including the New Perspective. We will pay special attention to archaeological finds from the Pauline cities, which help us understand better the cultural, political, and religious milieu in which the letters were received and read. Over Fall break (October 23- November 2) the class will travel to Greece and visit the archaeological sites of the cities with early Christ-communities and other important or relevant sites.
AnneMarie Luijendijk

Religions of Late Antiquity Workshop
REL 525

A weekly, year-long workshop providing students in the Religions of Late Antiquity with the opportunity to present their current research for discussion.
AnneMarie Luijendijk


Spring 2014

The Civilization of the Early Middle Ages
HIS 343

This course will survey the "Dark Ages" from the end of the Roman Empire to the end of the first millennium (ca. 400-1000 AD), often seen as a time of cultural and political decline, recently even labelled as the "end of civilization". The complex political and social landscape of the Roman Empire, however, had more to offer than just to end. This course will outline how early medieval people(s) in the successor states of the Roman Empire used its resources to form new communities and will suggest to understand the "Dark Ages" as a time of lively social and cultural experimentation, that created the social and political frameworks of Europe.
Helmut Reimitz

Themes in Islamic Culture - History 600-1800
NES 503

This year the course will be a seminar on Islamic history from 600 to 1800 intended to prepare students for Generals and for eventually teaching such a course.
Michael A. Cook


Fall 2013

HIS 543/HLS 543
The Origins of the Middle Ages:  History, Law and the Bible in the early Middle Ages

This seminar explores the transition from the late ancient to the medieval world through the lens of the historians of the time. What role did the writing of history play in understanding social change? Which preexisting historical models or texts were used, how were they reconfigured, and what new ones were created in order to respond to the fundamental social changes? How did the writing of history not only reflect but also encourage social change? The course explores these processes and introduces students of late antique and medieval studies to techniques such as codicology, palaeography, and the art of editing.
Helmut Reimitz

An Introduction to the Islamic Scholarly Tradition
NES 502

The course offers a hands-on introduction to such basic genres of medieval scholarship as biography, history, tradition, and Koranic exegesis, taught through the intensive reading of texts, mostly in Arabic. The syllabus varies according to the interests of the students and the instructor.
Michael A. Cook

Introduction to Medieval Latin
LAT 232

Selections from Medieval Latin prose and poetry, with emphasis on Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. Attention to developments in Latin in the period, as well as to the transmission and reception of the literature and values of Classical Antiquity.
Brent Shaw


Spring 2012

HIS 343 The Civilization of the Early Middle Ages
Helmut Reimitz

HIS 543 Historiography and Identity from late Antiquity to the Middle Ages
Helmut Reimitz

 


2001-2011
Regular offerings

ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

ART 100 – Introduction to the History of Art, Ancient to Medieval.

ART 201/ARC 205 – Roman Architecture.

ART 203 – Roman Art.

ART 204/HLS 204 – Pagans and Christians: Urbanism, Architecture and Art of Late Antiquity.

ART 205 – Medieval Art in Europe.

ART 206/HLS 206 – Byzantine Art and Architecture.

ART 232/NES 232– The Arts of the Islamic World.

ART 310/NES 309 - Introduction to Painting and Book Illumination of the Islamic World.

ART 312 – The Arts of Medieval Europe.

ART 315/ARC 315 – Medieval Architecture.

ART 320/ARC 320 – Rome, the Eternal City.

ART 430, 432 – Seminar, Medieval Art. See Topical Courses for past examples.

ART 435, 436 – Topics in Medieval Art, Architecture, and Theory. See Topical Courses for past examples.

ART 535 – Problems in Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Architecture. See Topical Courses for past examples.

ART 580/NES 580 – Great Cities of the Islamic World.

ART 585 – Problems in Islamic Art and Archaeology. See Topical Courses for past examples.

 

CLASSICAL GREEK

CLG 240/HLS 240 – Introduction to Postclassical Greek from the Late Antique to the Byzantine Era.

 

CLASSICS

CLA 219/HIS 219 – The Roman Empire, 31 B.C to A.D. 337.

CLA 325/HIS 329 – Roman Law.

CLA 326, 327/HIS 326, 327 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 522 – Problems in Greek History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 542 – Problems in Latin Literature. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 545 – Problems in Roman History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 546, 547 – Problems in Ancient History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

CLA 548/HLS 528 – Ancient and Medieval Numismatics.

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COM 205/HUM 205 – The Classical Roots of Western Literature.

COM 543 – Topics in Medieval Literature. See Topical Courses for past examples.

 

HELLENIC STUDIES

HLS 362/NES 362 - Special Topics in Byzantine Civilization. See Topical Courses for past examples.

HLS 500 – Topics in Hellenic Studies. See  Topical Courses for past examples

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

 

HISTORY

HIS 211 – Europe from Antiquity to 1700.

HIS 236/HLS 236 – The Greeks: History of a People.

EAS 336/HIS 319 – The Making and Transformation of Medieval China, 300-1200.

HIS 330/HLS 330 – The Muslim Mediterranean.

HIS 343/CLA 343 – The Civilization of the Early Middle Ages.

HIS 355/HLS 355 – Transformation of the Ancient World: Byzantium, 500-1200.

HIS 400 – Junior seminar in history. See Topical Courses for past examples.

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

HIS 543 – The Origins of the Middle Ages.

HIS 545, 546 – Readings in Renaissance and Reformation History. See Topical Courses for past examples related to Late Antiquity.

 

LATIN

LAT 232 – Introduction to Medieval Latin.

 

NEAR EASTERN STUDIES

NES 201/HIS 223 – Introduction to the Middle East.

NES 220/HIS 220 – Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Middle Ages.

NES 245/HIS 245 – The Islamic World from its Emergence to the Beginnings of Westernization..

SPA 308/NES 308 – Spanish Islam, A.D. 711-1492.

NES 323 – Introduction to Early Sufism (c. AD 800-1200).

NES 325/REL 325 – Christianity along the Silk Road.

NES 502 – An Introduction to the Islamic Scholarly Tradition.

NES 503 – Themes in Islamic History and Culture.

NES 515 – Introduction to Syriac.

NES 517 – Syriac Prose Writings.

NES 523 – Readings in Judeo-Arabic.

NES 524 – Introduction to Classical Armenian.

NES 531, 532 – Readings in Classical Arabic Literature.

NES 545 – Problems in Near Eastern Jewish History. See Topical Courses for past examples.

NES 547 – Intermediate Syriac.

NES 566 – Intermediate Armenian.

NES 590 – Syriac Studies Seminar. See Topical Courses for past examples.

           

PROGRAM IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

PAW 501 – Program Seminar. See Topical Courses for past examples.

 

RELIGION

NES 240/REL 240 – Muslims and the Qur’an.

REL 251 – The New Testament and Christian Origins.

REL 252 – The Early Christian Movement.

REL 335/NES 356 – Moses and Jesus in the Islamic Tradition.

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions. See Topical Courses for past examples.

REL 509 – Studies in the History of Islam. See Topical Courses for past examples
 

Topical/one-time courses

ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

ART 398/HLS 398 – The Byzantine Commonwealth, Then and Now. (F 2005)

ART 430 – Seminar, Medieval Art: Death and Salvation. (F2004)

ART 430 – Seminar, Medieval Art: Byzantine Monasteries. (F 2006)

ART 430 – Seminar, Medieval Art: The Other “Romanesque.” (F 2007)

ART 430 – Seminar, Medieval Art: Belfry and Minaret. (F 2008)

ART 432/CLA 432/HLS 432 – Island of Cultures: Sicily from the Greeks to the Normans. ( F 2009)

ART 435 –The Arts of Pilgrimage in the Middle Ages. ( S 2005)

ART 436 – Topics in Medieval Art, Architecture, and Theory: Concepts for the Depiction of God.  (S 2007, S 2011)

ART 438/NES 428 – Representations of Faith and Power: Islamic Architecture in Its Context. (F 2007)

ART 439 – Illuminations: Monuments of Medieval Art in Form and Theory. ( F 2004)

ART 499/HLS 499 – Architecture as Icon. (S 2010)

ART 513 – Seminar in Roman Art: Roman Triumphal Monuments. (S 2010)

ART 520 – Greek Art of the Iron Age and Orientalizing Periods. ( S 2007)

ART 531 – Roman Painting and Mosaic. ( S 2005)

ART 535 – Problems in Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Architecture: The Byzantine House (4th-15th cent.). (S 2004)

ART 535/HLS 535 – Problems in Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Architecture: Accessing Saints in the Eastern Christian World (ca. 300-ca.-1500). (S 2005)

ART 535/HLS 535 – Juncture of Heaven and Earth: The Monastery of St. Catherine on Mount Sinai. (S 2006)

ART 535 – Architecture as Icon. (S 2010)

ART 537 – Seminar in Medieval Art: Medieval Image/Concepts of Authenticity. ( S 2008)

ART 537/MED 500 – Seminar in Medieval Art: Medieval Images of Visionary Experience. (F 2009)

ART 539 – Seminar in Iconography. (F 2004)

ART 585 – Problems in Islamic Art and Archeology. ( S 2004)

 

CLASSICS

CLA 235/HLS 235 – Antiquity after Antiquity: Homer. ( S 2007)

CLA 326/HIS 326 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion: Slavery in the Roman World. (S 2005, F 2008)

CLA 326/HIS 326 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion: Religion in Roman Society. (S 2006, F 2010)

CLA 327/HIS 327 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion: Women in Ancient Rome. (S 2004, S 2008)

CLA 327/HIS 327 – Topics in Ancient History and Religion: How the Classics Became the Classics. (S 2008)

CLA 345 – Ancient Greco-Roman Medicine. (S 2009)

CLA 522- Problems in Greek History: The Greek East in the Roman Era.  (S 2007)

CLA 526 –Animals in Ancient Science and Medicine: Theories, Practices, Contexts. (S 2011)

CLA 541 – Survey of Early Medieval Latin Literature. ( S 2008)

CLA 542 – Problems in Latin Literature: Greek and Latin Textual Criticism. (S 2010)

CLA 545 – Problems in Roman History: Economies of Empire. (F 2004, S 2005)

CLA 545 – Problems in Roman History: Africa and Empire. (S 2006)

CLA 546 – Problems in Roman History: The Roman Family. (S 2008)

CLA 547/PAW 501 – Problems in Ancient History: Priests and Power in the Ancient World. (F 2004)

CLA 547/PAW 501 – Problems in Ancient History: Belief and Faith in Ancient Religions. (F 2006)

CLA 547/PAW 501 – Problems in Ancient History: The Language of the Gods: Prophecy, Oracles and Divination. (F 2007)

CLA 547 – Problems in Ancient History: Sacred Specialists in Ancient Societies. ( F 2010)

CLA 552 – Virgil and His Epic in the Middle Ages. (F 2005)

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COM 224/REL 290 – Representing the Queen of Sheba in the Islamic, Jewish, and Christian Traditions. (F 2009)

COM 311/MED 311 – Reading Medieval Culture. (S 2004)

COM 329/NES 326 – The Thousand and One Nights. ( S 2005)

COM 417/NES 417 – Genre East and West: A History of Literature of the Ancient Near East. ( S 2006)

COM 543 – Topics in Medieval Literature: Medieval Allegory. (S 2004)

COM 543 – Topics in Medieval Literature: The Medieval Voice. (S 2008)

 

HELLENIC STUDIES

HLS 362/NES 362 - Special Topics in Byzantine Civilization. Empires in Transition. (S 2004)

HLS 500/CLA 529 – Topics in Hellenic Studies: Rhetorical and Theatrical Performance in the Late Antique Greek World. (S 2001)

HLS 500/HIS 512 – Topics in Hellenic Studies: Greek Palaeography. (S 2007)

 

HISTORY

HIS 437/HLS 437 – Byzantium in the 10th Century: The Age of Reconquest. (S 2007, S 2008)

HIS 395 – History of Medicine and the Body. (S 2010)

HIS 400 – Junior seminar: The Mediterranean in History. (F 2004, F 2005)

HIS 400 – Junior seminar: The Afterlife of Antiquity in the Greek & Arabic Middle Ages. (F 2006)

HIS 423/HLS 423 – State and Ideology in Eastern Europe: From Byzantium to the Enlightenment. (S 2006)

HIS 435 – Mounted Nomads and Sedentary States in the Medieval World. (S 2010)

HIS 443/JDS 443 – Jewish History through the Middle Ages. (F 2005)

HIS 444/JDS 444 – The Bible in History. (F 2007)

HIS 445 – Medieval Saints and Society. (F 2010)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: The Formation of Byzantium, 600-850. (F 2006, F 2010)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: Byzantium and the Crusades. ( F 2009)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: Byzantium in the 10th Century: The Age of Reconquest. (F 2008)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: Introduction to Byzantine Studies. (S 2008)

HIS 542/HLS 542 – Problems in Byzantine History: Rethinking the 11th Century in Byzantium. (F 2007)

HIS 545, 546 – Readings in Renaissance and Reformation History: Visions of the Past in Early Modern Europe. (S 2006, F 2008)

HIS 546 – Reception of the Classical Tradition. (S 2011)

 

NEAR EASTERN STUDIES

NES 225 – What Happened in History? ( S 2001, S2003)

NES 235/REL 235 – In the Shadow of Swords: Martyrdom and Holy War in Islam. (F 2009)

NES 237/REL 237 – The Medieval Islamic World. (F 2003)

NES 355/JDS 355 – Between Swords and Stones: Jerusalem, a History. (S 2010, S 2011)

NES 420 – Church and State in Late Antiquity. (F 2010)

NES 430/REL 439 – Qur’an in English. (S 2008)

NES 447 – Qur’anic Commentary. (S 2009)

NES 510 – Julian the Apostate in Syriac Sources. (F 2007)

NES 522 – Readings in Classical Arab Historians and Biographers. (S 2001, S 2003)

NES 533 – Syriac Hagiography. (F 2009)

NES 545 – Problems in Near Eastern Jewish History. (S 2004)

NES 545 – Problems in Near Eastern Jewish History. (S 2005, S 2007)

NES 545 – Problems in Near Eastern Jewish History: “Autonomy, Community, and Leadership.” (S 2006)

NES 546 – Concepts of Knowledge in Classical Islam. (S 2004)

NES 590 – Syriac Poetry and Homiletic Literature. (S 2004)

NES 592 – Symbols and Allegory in Medieval Islamic Art. (S 2004)

NES 599 – Syriac Biblical Interpretations. (F 2006)

 

PROGRAM IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

PAW 501 – Program Seminar: Cultural History of Syria: From the Late Bronze Age to Early Islam. (F  2005)

 

RELIGION

REL 253/WOM 253 – Early Christian Women: From Mary Magdalen to Martyred Mothers. ( S 2007)

REL 256 – Sacred Space and Christianity. (S 2008)

REL 270 – Christianity in the Medieval Millennium, c. 476-1453. (F 2009)

REL 301/HLS301 – Eastern Orthodox Christianity. (F 2010)

REL 312 – Augustine and Aquinas. (F 2008)

REL 330/NES 349 – Magic and Miracles in the Lands of Islam. ( S 2007)

REL 341/JDS 341 – Christianity and the Rabbis in Late Antiquity. (S 2004)

REL 343 – Jews, Gentiles, and Christians in the Ancient World. (F 2001, F 2004)

REL 350 – God, Satan, Demons, Angels: Invisible Beings, Identity and Politics. (S 2003)

REL 372/JDS 372 – God’s Body: Hebrew Bible, Rabbinic Literature, and Jewish Mysticism. (S 2008)

REL 385 - Spiritual Exercises: Classics of Christian Spirituality. (F 2008)

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions: Genres of Rabbinic Literature. (F 2004)

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions. (S 2008)

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions: Constructions of Identity in Late Antiquity – Josephus and Eusebius. ( S 2004)

REL 504/HLS 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions: Literary and Documentary Papyrology. (S 2007, F 2009)

REL 504 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions: Varieties of Early Christianity. (S 2009)

REL 507 – Studies in Religion and Philosophy: Augustine and Political Augustinianisms. (S 2011)

REL 508 – Studies in Religion and Morality: Augustine and Aquinas. (S2006)

REL 509 – Studies in the History of Islam: Historiography of Religion and Society. (F 2003)

REL 509 – Studies in the History of Islam: Medieval Islamic Narrative and Modern Historiography. (F 2004, S 2006)

REL 510 – Special Topics in the Study of Religion: Rabbinic Cosmology and Its Contexts. ( S 2004)

REL 512 – Studies in Greco-Roman Religions. (S 2007)

REL 525 – Religions of Late Antiquity Workshop. (F 2010)